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Full text of "Emblem"

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1952 



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DOUGLAS LIBRARY 
CHICAGO STATE UNIVERSITY 



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DATE DUE 



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EMBLEM 










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Tcmt'fPU^.S Child fen 



These children to whom we have dedicated our lives are the 
security of coming generations. We, as future teachers, realize that we 
are the contractors designated to design a pattern of life for these 
children to follow. It must be elastic, it must be adaptable, most of 
all it must be expressly for children. This is our duty. It must be 
fulfilled. 




DEAN COOK WATCHES GOVERNOR STEVENSON 
SIGN A BILL 

June 19, 1951 was a historic date for the Chicago Teachers 
College. House Bill 491 has been unanimously passed by both houses 
of the Illinois General Assembly and with the Governor's signature 
became the law of the state. For the first time in the 82-year history 
of the school, state funds became available for public teacher education 
in Chicago. One million dollars of state money was appropriated to 
reimburse the Board of Education for the expense of operating the 
Chicago Teachers College. This action did much to assure the future 
stability and adequate support of the school. 

In return for this new source of support, the College has made 
certain changes in its practices. All curricula were reviewed to see 
that our graduates henceforth meet all the technical requirements for 
State of Illinois certification. By changing the rules for admission, 
the Board of Education opened the College to residents of any part 
of the state on the same basis as residents of Chicago. 

Besides Governor Adlai E. Stevenson and Dean Cook, the 
picture includes prominent members of the General Assembly who 
had been active in securing passage of the bill. They are, from left 
to right, Representative John G. Ryan of the 13th District, Chicago, 
Senator Robert E. Young of Hurst, and Representative W. O. Edwards 
of Danville. 




Since the first public elementary school appeared in Chicago, 
the system has maintained a reputation undisputed in the field of 
education. These elementary schools are the important first step in 
the molding of capable citizens. It is within the walls of his grammar 
school that the child begins to develop incentive, ambition, honor, 
sense of fair play and many other basic personality traits. It is in his 
grammar school that the child learns the qualities of leadership and 
the equal importance of teamwork and being a good follower. 

The 1952 Emblem salutes the Chicago Public Elementary 
Schools, builders of ideals, may you never be forced to relinquish 
this position! 




!^»n» 



^ 







To the Members of the June, 1952 Class: 

As tomorrow's teachers you have a great and shining future before you. 
Wealth of far more significant value than gold is to be yours, for you are promised 
the sincere devotion of girls and boys and the gratitude of everyone in the community 
interested in the welfare of our young people. 

Innumerable problems you will have to solve, but each one will serve as a 
challenge which successfully met will result In your personal growth and feeling of 
mastery over situations no matter how difficult. You are launching your careers at a 
most propitious moment, at a time when the status of the teaching profession is 
steadily progressing toward the high level of esteem which it merits. The American 
public is rapidly becoming fully cognizant of the true worth of the women and men who 
serve as guardians not only of the children in their charge but of the tradition that 
holds that the public school system is an indestructible force for the preservation of 
our democratic way of life and the principles underlying our American institutions. It 
is with this encouraging thought of the future that I express the hope that you may 
approach your work in the classroom with eager anticipation of the rewarding oppor- 
tunities and widening horizons that await those of you who accept the attendant 
responsibilities with courage, bringing to them good cheer, creative thought, knowl- 
edge, imagination, and that sympathy which makes you one with girls and boys seeking 
your counsel. 

To you all I extend warmest greetings and all good wishes for happiness and 
success in abundance. 

Sincerely yours, 

HEROLD C. HUNT 

General Superintendent of Schools 



CONTENTS 



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theit fecial ^fcti^tfi f 




THEIR 



LEADERS 



Not everyone is born a leader, many more are followers. A 
good leader must know how to satisfy the needs of his followers. 
So a leader of children must understand the capabilities of his 
followers and help them to develop their potentialities as leaders. 




DEAN COOK 

Emblem staff of 1952 would like to express its deepest appreci- 
ation to Dean Cook for his splendid cooperation without which we 
could not have printed this book. We needed only to ask and he 
gave as much help as he possibly could. Other organizations in the 
school have also felt the Dean's helping and guiding hand in their 
activities. We think of him not only as a Dean but also as a loyal 
and dependable friend. The students of CTC feel that he has helped 
them prepare to meet the problems of the world and the task of being 
capable and well equipped teachers. 



10 



ADMINISTRATION 




MR. KAISER 
Efficiency and a recognizable 
individualism mark this man as a 
favorite among both students and 
clerks. Our capable Assistant Dean 
can be found in his office any time 
he is not aiding an activity some- 
where else in the building. It is 
truly a treat to do business with 
this wonderfully hospitable man. 



MR. SWEARINGEN 

Mr. Swearingen has the difficult 
and highly frustrating position of 
Director of Instruction. The plan- 
ning and replanning of programs, 
arranging and rearranging of Cur- 
riculum is by no means the easiest 
job in the world; but in spite of 
this gigantic task, he maintains his 
sense of balance and sanity. Stu- 
dent's needs are met and their diffi- 
culties ironed out to the reasonable 
satisfaction of everyone involved. 
Friendliness and cooperation are 
outstanding traits of this man 
whom both faculty and students 
admire and respect. 





Emma Fleer Muller 

Registrar and director of Personnel 



Marie Truax 

Director of Student Activities 





Oscar Waichirk 

Assistant Registrar 



OFFICE STAFF 






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Ora E. Anders 



Clara M. Berghofer 



Mary E. Durkin M. Larkin 



G. Berry 
Catherine McCahey 



13 







Elizabeth B. Murphy 




Loretta H. Wallace 




Mercedes C. Walsh 



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FACULTY 



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B. D. Allinson 
Vernon W. Brockmann 
William Card 



Edvin Brye 
George E. Butler 
J. Carter 



Fred K. Branom 
Gertrude Byrne 
Jos. Chada 



15 















Louise Christensen 

John W. Emerson 
Ralph C. Goode 



\ 7 



Thomas F. Coffey 
Dorothea Ewers 
Elizabeth R. Hennessey 




Edward C. Colin 
Henrietta Fernitz 
Coleman Hewitt 



16 







I 







A 



Edna C. HIckey 
Jacqueline Krump 
Viola G. Lynch 




David Kopel 
Herbert F. Lamp 
Ursula Maethner 




Joseph Kripner 
Philip Lewis 
Philip H. McBaIn 



17 














Gertrude W. O'Hagen 


Ellen M. Olson 


John Pfau 


Dorothy V. Phipps 


Louise C. Robinson 


Seymour Rosofsky 


Eloise Rue 


Jeronae M. Sachs 


1. Schuiz 



18 










J. J. Seegel 
G. J. Steiner 
David Temkin 




Leonard J. Simutis 
Irwin Suloway 
Louise L. Tyler 




Shirley Ellen Stack 
CatherineM. Taheny 
Joseph J. Urbancek 



19 



"% 





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Fritz Veil 



Robert J. Walker 



Sylvan D. Ward 



H. Williston 



Dorothy E. Willy 



Janet Young 



20 




Roberta Aiken 
Ann Gallagher 
Annetta King 
Margaret McGregor 



Ruth Colquhon Bernadette Devereux Grace Dewar 

Frances Hyland Frank Heidenreich Audrey Keefer 

Shirley Lee Charles Lewis Jeannine Lux 

Paula McNicholas Dorothy Miller Bess Perkins 




Marguerite Pfordresher Lois Rainey 
Martha Weiler Bernice Woodard 



Salvatore Vallina 
Rosemary Zahn 



Virginia Walsh 




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22 



THE SENIORS 




23 



^enhi- Oau O^pcetA 





Daniel Remahl 
President 




11. * 



Gloria Bertoia 

Treasurer 



24 



THE SENIORS 




Virginia Alhorn 


Joanne Anderson 


Mary Anderson 


Lorraine Antimonik 


Marvin Azriel 


Dolores Bulinski 


Louis Barnes 


Thomas Barton 


Jacqueline Benson 


Gloria Bertoia 


Madaline Be+ker 


Rosemary Biagi 


Chester Blair 


Marian Borgstrom 


Angela Boylan 


Eileen Brown 



25 





ii^ .JHKl^dilk. iMMk>.^ilik Hi^ 



Jeanne Brunner 
Margaret Byrnes 
Marilyn Conroy 
Richard Davis 



Orpen Bryan 
Mary Casey 
Rosennary Crane 
Marian Drebing 



Dorothy Buehler 

Joan Catalan 
Jessie Cutt 
Barbara Ellis 



Ruth Burgeman 
Gladys Colennan 
Mary Dalianis 
Lola Farley 



26 




Virginia Faron 


Elvira Fiascone 


Marie Finn 


Mark Frank 


Dorothy Freeman 


Patricia Gaughan 


Lula Gavin 


Rita Giancola 


Sally Gibbons 


Robina Grant 


Marcia Grasse 


Mary GrifRn 


Helen Sroetsenna 


Gloria Grolla 


Doryce Heifer 


Ruth Jackson 



27 




Rosealie Kameron 
Elizabeth Kloman 
Albert Korach 
Lorraine Leyden 



Alice Kanelos 
Irene Knock 
Marjorie Koranda 
Marie Locke 



Joan Kellogg 
Joanne Knoebel 
Rita Kunka 
Betty Madsen 



Irene Kelly 
Josephine Komiak 
Genevieve Leonard 
Donald Martin 



28 




Jaqueline Meyers 
Patricia McHugh 
Joyce C. Ovitz 
Jack L Perlin 



Anne Morgan 
Mary O'Leary 
Charles Pace 
Avic Perry 



Leslie Morris 
Mary O'Malley 
Irene Patterson 
Joan Peterson 



Celeste McDonough 
Vincent O'Neill 
Arnold M. Perlin 
George Pfeiffer 



29 




i^^i f^> Wl ^Y 




Renee Pope 


Margaret Ratajczak 


Daniel Remahl 


Loretta Rocka 


Mary Rohan 


Shirley Satek 


Carol Sanders 


Marie Scopelite 


Florence Shaplio 


Mary Shea 


Jeanne Slaughter 


Wilma Smith 


Thomas Solon 


Jean Sondin 


Donald Sparks 


Sally Keeley 



30 




Eleanore Teske Charlane Thompson Clarice Tinnelle Jean Tomek 

Carol Turner Robert Van Hoy Pearl Waicosky Betty Walker 

Ruth Wesley Jean Smith Edmond E. Walsh Maureen Ward 

Margaret Weber Virginia Witzman Ann Zubak Joni Zuber 




DIna Zouras Seraldlne Bowman 



32 



THE 




33 



juHht Clau O^pcei-A 




1^ 



Sol Salario 
Vice President 



Louise Cortilet+i 

President 








Doris Collins 
Secretary 




Mary T. Burke 
Treasurer 



34 










# 

a/'^^'^ 

^ 
^ 


/I 



Joan Marie Abrams Daisy Adkins John A. Arko 

Marshall Baike Anita Balzweit Dorothea Baxter 

Eugene Bekta Carol Bell Margaret Berta 

Theodore Besser Vinita Beuschlein Earl Blanchard 




\ 

Jim Bailey 
Arlene Bayuk 
Yvonne Bertha 
Kavork Boghosian 



35 




/ 





Joan Bozeman 


Helen Brennan 


Elizabeth Brenzing 


Rose Bronlarczyk 


Stella Budz 


Marge Burke 


Mary T. Burke 


Daniel Bystrowski 


Josephine Cannaiaro 


Barbara Carlson 


Marjorie Carlson 


Claire Carmody 


Cannille Carter 


Jean Cates 


Natalie Coci 


Marea Chavis 



36 




Georgia Chears 
Verma Coleman 
Vivienne Cornell 
Mary Cunnea 



Mary Cleary 
Doris Collins 
John Costello 
Millicent Dahistrom 



Maureen Caghlan 
Patricia Comeskey 
Louise Cor+ile++i 
Marilyn DeGroot 



V / 

Doris Coleman 
Velma Cooper 
Connie Crump 
Conrad DePaul 



/ 

i 4 



37 




Frank J. DePaul 
Syrll Donlger 
Mary Dyra 
Barbara Enzenbacker 



Eleanor Demovic 
Dolores Doody 
Nancy Dziadkowiec 
Rita Ewert 



Maurice Dickman 
Seraldine Dorwick 
Jacqueline Elmore 
^ohn Fewkes 



Gertrude Dickson 
Audrey Dudley 
Maureen Enright 
Lee R. Fieffer 



38 




^ ^ ^ 




nmm^ 




•^ 


/€ 


Patricia Fiscella 


Eleanor Fischer 


Richard Flanagan 


Donna Fox 


Genevieve Friewer 


Jean Gade 


Zoeann Gadwood 


Pat Gary 


Helen Marie Gegan 


Joseph Gleason 


Charlotte Glass 


Sally Goldberg 


Elizabeth Gonzales 


Ruth Gosswein 


Irene Green 


Mattie Greene 




39 




i^ 





^ 



Alber+a Gresh 
Tom Healey 
James Hilton 
Joseph Hron 





^ 



'^ 






Frances Guzior 
Anne Higgins 
Mabel Hinger 
Marian Humes 






4 . 




Dolores Greenspun 
Jack Hillebrand 
Roberta Hodnett 
Patricia Hyland 



Patricia Heagney 
Carole Hillman 
Joyce Howland 
Myrtle Ivey 



40 




Aretha Jackson ^^'orla Jackson 

Erlinga Jorgensen Michael Jovovich 

Peggy Keffe Marion Keske 



Robert Kerensky 



Mitchell Krauszowski 



Reva James 
Louis Just 
Pauline Kirby 
Marion Krik 



Nancy Jones 
Helen Kalchbrenner 
Elizabeth Kleckner 
Jerry Kruchten 



41 




Dolores Kurent 
Joan Lillis 
Charlena Luttrell 
Robert Malinski 



Shirley Kubillus 
Genevieve Lober 
Marifrances Lynch 
James Maloney 



Verlie Leaner 
Isabel Lombardo 
Mary Alice Madden 
Jean Mann 



Rose Leo 
Shulamith Lome 
Alice Magnusson 
Dorothy Marek 



42 




George C. Marema 
Milton Mayer 
Teresa McNicholas 
Elaine Mojzis 



Rosennary Maroney 
Mary McDIvif 
Mary McQuaid 
Richard Moore 



Pat Martin 
Marilyn McDonald 
Therese Milanowski 
Marion Morris 



Anne Maturi 
Estelle McMahan 
Marilyn Miller 
Frona Mudlaff 



43 




Barbara Mueller 
Annie Lee Neil 
Diane Oehlberg 
Jean Oswald 



Julie Mulvaney 
Dolores Novak 
Germaine Olsen 
Betty Petrone 



Pauline Nadovic 
Aileen O'Connel 
Loretta O'Neill 
Warren Pietsch 



Charlene Naser 
Arlene O'Donnell 
Mary Kay Orwig 
Walter Pilditch 



44 




Tom Plain 


Gracia Pontecorvo 


James G. Porter 


Barbara Price 


Lucille Przybyiowski 


Marvin Raskin 


Henry Rauch 


Barbara Reynolds 


Lillian Rogers 


Pat Rooney 


Estelle Rose 


Muriel Ross 


Lois Jean Rusco 


Patricia Ryan 


Pat Ryan 


Sol Salario 



45 




Mary Louise Scott 
Mary Shannon 
Sharon Smith 
Eleanor Stohl 



Joan Sering 
Laura Siewierski 
Jean Spears 
Helen Strlngham 



Dolores Strothman 
Gloria Tapp 



Helen Shannon 
Doris Smith 
Nancy Stratton 
Jennelle Templeton 



46 




Helen Theiss 


Charlotte Tice 


James Tracy 


Ruth Turner 


Elsie Vana 


Judy Vanek 


Vera J. Vaughns 


Betty Lou Velebil 


Gerry Wall 


Nancy Walsh 


Beverly Warren 


Marlene Wehrle 


Margie Whelan 


Helen A. Williams 


Joyce Williams 


Margaret Willis 



47 





Harold Wingfield Mary Woods 



Floyd Wyrlclc 



Loris Zubb 



48 



THE SOPHOMORES 




49 



^ofthmi-e /I Cla^A O^pcerA 




Arlene O'Donnell 
President 





Barbara Carlson 
Vice President 



Marilyn DeGroot 
Secretary 



50 



"^ "*■ t? 

41b 



Clarence E. Smith 
President 




Elaine Katzman 
Vice President 





V 



Alice Strusz 
Secretary 




Holly Adams 
Angela E. Batteast 
Muriel Bell 
Connie Boudos 



Doris Alfredson 
Don Bayer 
Louis Bier 
Barbara Brandt 



Joe Anderson 
Jewel Beifuss 
Joan Bolger 
Stella Brando 



Margaret Mary Balla 
Yvonne E. Belin 
Frances Bombino 
Pat Bridges 



52 




Mary Louise Buckley 


Ronald Budil 


Rosennary Burke 


Tony Burke 


Lois Butts 
Sandra Cogen 
Rose Cortina 


Marie Cannizzo 
Nedra Collins 
Nelia Cunnea 


Patt Cavanaugh 
Florence Cooper 
Shirley Daluga 


Georgine Clancy 
Ann Cortilet 
Barbara Davia 



53 









Marilyn Davidson 
Mariclare Doody 
Maida Edels+ein 
Ru+h Patricia Foley 




tx 



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Clarice Dawkins 
Lois Ann Du Mais 
Kenneth Ellis 
Paul Fornatar 




^ 



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Dorothy Dawson 
Winifred Duncan 
Shirley Ellis 
Anita Frank 






Joan DeLacey 
Rita Eckstedt 
Artishia Ervin 
Carol Frazier 



54 







>:.| 

♦» 



■^ 



^\ 





V 








^ 
^j 



Dorothy DePratt 
Marion Graham 
Harry Hague 
Lucille Heaney 



June Glickauf 
Grace Graves 
Anna Marie Harris 
Daphne Hennings 



Nancy Glusack 
Barbara J. Green 
Dolores Harder 
Carole Hickey 



Cecile Goodman 
Jessica Gronek 
Joan Hash 
James L. Hicks 



55 




Richard Higgins 
Carol Jacobsen 
Marilyn Johnson 
Loretta Jozwiak 



Barbara Hills Patricia Hockstad ^^'"o' Hudson 

Marianne Jankiewicz Marlena Jarrells Dorothy Johnson 

Inez Marie Jones Lois H. Jones Joan Joyce 

Elaine Katzman Betty Kearney Barbara Kelley 



56 




Marlene Kendall 
Joan Keames 
Joan Kurowski 
Margaret Leonard 



Joan Kingsland 
William Kretz 
Carmen LaBranca 
Doris Loehr 



Betty Knoth 
Mary Jo Korzeniewski 
Joanne Lake 
Yvonne McCabe 



Regina Kraft 
Janet Kulczynski 
Charmaine LeMaIre 
Barbara McCann 



57 



f^ ^ Ci" '*» 

1» ^.i^ 




Frances McCullagh 
Dolores McLemore 

Barbara Michaelson 
John MoreschI 



Shirley McDonald Patricia McFarland Marty McGrath 

Margaret Maemberg Joan Marquardt Elizabeth Masa 

Elaine Mechenfelder Gloria Miller Harold Moody 

Carol Muehr Delphine Musial R'na Naddeo 



58 




Doris Newby 


Edward M. Nicol 


Joan M. O'Connell 


Rita O'Donnell 


Edward O'Farrell 


Rita O'Leary 


Barbara Page 


Gus Pantazes 


Ron Patterson 


Marilyn E. Planch 


Barbara Pulliam 


Maxine Reames 


Virqinia C. Reid 


Arlene Riebau 


Marge Riemer 


Toby Reitzeic 



59 




^ 




^ 


t 1 — 


1 '^ 


1 . -^ 


'^=-> ^ 


-'-'- i 




4% 






Helmer Ringstrom 


Dorothy Rejan 


DeLayce Roan 


Helene Russell 


Maureen Ryan 


Janice Samples 


Harold Savnecici 


Angelyn Scaizo 


Carol Seng 


Marilyn Shalln 


Margaret Shannon 


Lenora Sherman 


Dorothy Small 


Clarence E. Smith 


Margery Starnicky 


Evelyn Stoginski 



m ^^^ 



> 

^ 



60 




^ 







^^ 




">-\ 



f> o 




Barbara Stolk Alice Strusz 

Marilyn Tienstra Marilynne Tindall 

Nancy Anne Totten Martha Tragnitz 

Lorraine Wainauskis Marianne Wall 



Joan Sullivan 
Betty Toborg 
Phil Valaika 
Rita Wall 



i<^^^ 



Dorothy Tabor 
Marion Toomey 
Dorothy Vandermar 
Bob Ward 





a 



4 



■"«». -*i 



V^lR^^i 



Mary Jeanne Walsh 


Joan Walsh 


Patricia Watson 


Cecilia A. Williams 


Lois Woelkers 


Dolores Zachwieja 


Clare Zanatta 


Rudolph John Zubb 


Nicholas Golemis 


Joyce Penson 







62 



THE FRESHME] 




63 



9feAtnah fi CiaU 0^(icetA 





Jean Pearson 
President 




Dorothy DePratt 
Vice President 



64 



9feAthaH S Cla^^ O^^icet^ 






Edward Martin 
Vice President 




Nancy Carey 
President 




Chalice Nugent 
Treasurer 




V 



Anne Noel King 

Secretary 



65 




Barbara Allen 


Claire Anderson 


Fairrow Anderson 


Beverly Barz 


Irma Jean Bell 


Martha Brummit 


Donald Broholm 


Gerry Burke 


Sylvia Byrd 


Elizabeth Cahill 


Arlene Carter 


Mary Lou Chears 


Louis Christopher 


Caroline Cicen 


Doris M. Clay 


Alice Colbert 



66 



* -^ "^ 



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O 




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Biir.e Coleman Dorothy Coleman Anne Coniglio Jack Cooper 

Mary Jean Crisler Norma Cunnea Cornelia B. Dawkins Gloria DeFonte 

Mary Joan Dennison Catherine Desmond Jerry Donahue Pat Dorsey 

he. Douglas •- Eadlen Edna Ekstrom Shirley Eisner 



67 




Katherine Evans Eleanor Fay Mary Fay 

Jeanne Fergus Dolores Flynn Margaret Folton 

Diane Freik Marion French Retza Gladdis 

Joseph Gilbert Judith Rae Gittermann Richard Gornick 



Herbert Feldman 
Marian Franklin 
Catherine Gibbons 

Nancilu Gray 








M 



Marilyn Hacke+t 


Irene Harenza 


Nina Harris 


Willie Hendrix 


Claire Smith Hece 


Catherine Higgins 


Mary Alice Higgins 


Monica Hopkins 


Marie Huebner 


Barbara Husband 


Marion Jaimeyfleld 


Leslie Johnson 


Dorothy Johnson 


Sandra Karlson 


Juanita Kelly 


Marlene Kendall 



69 




Mary Kay Larson Rose Lids+rom Margaret Luckett Mary J. Lux 

Celesta Manning Pat McAllister Jayne McCarthy Shirley McCollum 

Sylvia E. McGee Mildred McGinnis Geraldine McLendon Ruth Michaels 

Mary Jane Miller Dorothy Moeller Melvin Moore Dorothy Morgan 



70 




Wayne Morley 
Mary Ellen Mulcahy 
Ellen Murtaugh 
Patricia Norlander 



Bettye Morris 
Arlene Murphy 
Rose Musacchio 
Jean Overs+reet 



Dolores Morrison 
Judy Murphy 
Shirley Nieman 
Roxie Parker 



Cecil H. Mowery 
Marjorie Murphy 
Beatrice M. Nebel 
Janet W. Pilgrim 




Rosemary Podmolik 
Vilma Randolph 
Nancy Reynolds 
Margaret Roche 



Julia Powell 
Dorothy Ratkow 
Shirley Richards 
Arlene Ross 



Norma Jean Powers 
Helen Redding 
Audrey Robinson 
Marilyn Rubenstein 



Verda Pradd 
Joan Reichert 
Jean Robinson 
Marvin M. Rubin 



72 



f^ 1^ ^ 





^-^^ ^' f^^ 



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m 



/^ ^•'#//i 




i y^ 



Calette M. Sana 


Morris Salario 


Marida Sampson 


Roy Scheid 


Marion Schick 


Marion Scurlock 


Dorothy Sedivec 


Claire Sedlock 


Shirley Serig 


Joan Shaffer 


Joan Shannon 


Gordon Sharp 


LaVern Sims 


Robert Smith 


Murllease Smith 


Lawrence E. Smith 



73 




J 



Florence T. Stein 


Monica Stoga 


11 

Myrtle Supples 


Mary Tierney 


Elaine Trauscht 


Harrison Tyler 


Judy Tyskling 


Diane Wagner 


Shirley Wall 


Geraldine Walsh 


Dorothy Washington 


Frances V. Warren 


Lois Whitmal 


Claudine Williams 


Grace Williams 


Dorothy Williams 



74 




Phyllis Wilson 
Sue Carol Wright 



Jean Wise 
Robert Yangas 



Alicia Woods Patricia A. Woods 



75 




76 




NORTH SIDE BRANCH 



77 



NORTH SIDE BRANCH FACULTY 



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Raoul R. Haas 



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Ellsworth Paris 



Merle F. Silver 







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Anna M. Kummer 



Irwin Widen 



Gay Cunningham 



78 



NORTH SIDE BRANCH 




Mary Barba+o Lois Berggren 

Suzanne Dayton Judith Deke 

Rosemary Flastring Charlene Frank 

Louise Gross Philomena Guerra 



Roberta Czernijiwskl 
Marilyn Dudley 
Eunice Goldberg 
Yolanda Gulino 



Betty Dorenbos 
Ann Dyra 
Diane Goodman 
Elaine Hackett 



79 




Therese Laba Marilyn Heiden Marion Huss 

Geraldine Kalasa Beverly Keller Carol Klay 

Faye Kozemczak R^^g ^^rie Kozlawski Dolores Krandel 

Virginia Lakowski Lucille Lipinski Shirley Lynge 



Loretta Kaczmarek 
Joyce Kowal 
Therese Laba 
Mary Madigan 






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Eugenia Maffei 


Lorene Majka 


Mary Mason 


Jeanette Mucha 


Irene Pavlik 


Beverly Preston 


Gloria Ristich 


Dianne Schaedee 


Geraldine Schuyler 


Jean Sneri 


Jayne Swiatek 


Arlene Swierczek 


Josie Szypulski 


Margaret Viktory 


Verdelle WIdegren 


Chester Wiklorski 




82 




83 




ff<^H/i ^i4e Stanch 



84 




mfth ^i4e Stanch 



85 



THEIR 



MENTAL 



DEVELOPMENT 



Reading, writing, and 'rithmetic are no longer the only 
components of education. A child must learn to correlate his schooling 
with everyday living. He must learn to think logically and independ- 
ently. He must learn to use his mind and thought processes as means 
to an action, not as the result of an act. Nature granted man the 
ability to reason; let him do it well. 



86 







87 




Every child likes to draw, paint and in essence, create with his 
hands; therefore art is a very necessary requirement of a well balanced 
educational program. For this reason the Art Department is well 
established in the teacher training program of C.T.C. 

All students are required to take four art courses which are 
aimed to further the student's participaion and interest in art, and 
to develop the ability to successfully teach this subject. 

The department also offers many extensive and interesting 
courses for those students who wish to specialize in this field. 




"Do, and by doing, learn," seems to be the guiding motto of 
the Education Department, whose members are counsellors to the 
students during their periods of supervised teaching. 

The Education Department initiates the student teacher into 
the profession by supplying the necessary background. This involves 
discussing problems in the tield of education in the light of psycho- 
logical and social issues to which they are related. It includes the 
historical background of these issues and possible solutions. Most of 
all, the Education Department equips the students with the principles 
of teaching, ability to plan instruction, means of providing individual 
differences, and evaluation of instruction along the lines of broad 
educational aspects. 

EDUCAT 



ENGLISH 



In a far corner of the third floor, the English Department works 
unceasingly to meet the student's needs in the lield of English. 

Work in the department is divided into three divisions. The 
largest category includes the communication and literature courses 
required of all freshmen and sophomores. Next in importance are 
the methods courses dealing with the important phases of elementary 
school English. Next are the electives designed to give interested 
students more of a background in the held of English. 




90 



HOME ECONOMICS 



We cook, we sew, we build, we saw, we count our calories and 
time our plastics. In short we do everything, that's the Home Economics 
Department. It is divided into two sections. One section, industrial 
arts, where we learn to work and create with our hands; the other 
section is home mechanics where we learn to live with the family, the 
nutrition of the family and for H.E. minors, to cook and sew for 
the family. 




91 



The industrial arts department is in affiliation with the home 
economics department and together they offer the home mechanics 
sequence. A cooperative policy is also maintained with the science, 
art, and kindergarten departments whose students are instructed in 
the use of audio-visual aids. This department believes that all teachers 
should be acquainted with the simple crafts utilized in shops and 
similar manual training areas in the public school. Consequently, a 
required industrial arts course is given to all students. 





1 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS 



92 




This is the department that turns out those lovable creatures, 
the primary and kindergarten teacher. She learns hngerpainting, model 
making, letter cutting, and a multitude of other skills under the careful 
eye of the instructors of the department. Our kindergarten teachers and 
1st, 2nd, and 3rd grade teacher are our most valuable, for thev have the 
privilege of giving the first formal education to the children. 



93 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 



^■1 




^H 


^1 


^^^^ 


^iiti^ ^»- 




n 


^^v^ 


'■■"* 


/ ^ 


^^^B 


Tit 


w 


i^\^ 


.S\>: 



Baby of C.T.C.'s departments is the Library Science Department 
which includes courses in reading guidance, processing in library 
materials, and reference materials for the elementary school. 

Library science minors are fortunate, for they have two profes- 
sions when they graduate, that of teacher and also that of a librarian. 

The Library Science Department began as part of the Chicago 
Elementary School Library Unit and has become an important member 
of the C.T.C. family. 



94 



MATHEMATICS 




Content and method are the two main fields covered in the 
Mathematics Department. Freshmen are introduced to this most exact- 
ing of sciences through the introductory content courses which include 
an excellent review of all previously learned math processes. 

Techniques and methods, practiced by experienced teachers, 
are handed down to the students in the methods courses. The Depart- 
ment also offers more advanced courses for students especially inter- 
ested in this subject. 



95 



MUSIC 




Music, the department that takes us through our do, re, mi's to 
a higher skill and facility. With theory courses we learn our funda- 
mentals. With method courses we use these fundamentals and 
experience at least a part of what we want our children to experience. 
We sing, we create, we feel the rhythm in our rote songs — and it's all 
loads of fun. Ah, then there's the choir and the orchestra and don't 
forget Phi Alpha. They are the music groups that show us all how 
much fun our work in music really is. 



96 




PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION 

Our famous P.E. department that demonstrates to us how many 
muscles there are in the body by making each one aching and sore. 
The Department offers us a full program including the teaching of 
social dancing, square dancing, games on a graded level for the 
elementary schools, body and muscle building exercises, swimming, 
tennis, badminton and a whirl of exhausting activities to keep us 
limber and alive. 




97 




The social development of the child in a school situation and 
the important problem of student adjustment to a college curriculum 
are the two items of note dealt with in the psycholoy department. It 
can be said that its varied courses help to orient students first to 
college, and then to the world. Faculty members of the department 
are ever willing to discuss student problems and aid them in finding 
a solution. A psychology minor is also available to students, interested 
in the subject. 



98 




Here we have our little bulbs, bugs, planaria and microbes. We 
all begin by sailing (?) through zoology or botany, then push onward 
to Physical Science or Microbiology and Human Anatomy and from 
there we are all set for the Science Method courses. In our Science 
Department we have an excellent staff of instructors to show us the 
how and where of the many aspects of animal and plant life in our 
world. We must not forget the P.E. minors and their Cat Anatomy 
classes. They've batted their heads against many a wall while memor- 
izing muscle after muscle. 




99 



The Social Science Club, under the sponsorship of Dr. Henrietta 
Fernitz, has had a very successful year. 

All students who minor in social science or history are members 
of the club, although anyone interested in the activities of the club is 
invited to the meetings. The officers for this year have been Joan 
Slomkoski, President; Mary Griffin, Vice-President; Laura Siewierski, 
Secretary; and William Cutt, Treasurer. 

We have been fortunate in hearing Dr. Gertrude Smith, a 
noted authority on Greece, and Miss Elsebet Alberts, who is studying 
at Northwestern and teaches deaf children in Denmark. Dr. Paris, 
of our own faculty, has also given an interesting speech about Germany. 





100 



SPEECH 




In keeping with CTC's policy of aiding future teachers in 
every way possible, a speech department has been installed to improve 
linguistic ability and correct minor speech defects. Mr. Robert J. 
Walker heads this small but very welcome new addition to the vast 
program of teacher training at the college. 



101 



THEIR 



GROWTH 



After work there is time for fun. Doing things, playing games, 
being with people — all these are essential to life and growth. Social 
ease is as important as the ability to read or cipher. Play, have fun, 
be happy, children. The world is yours. 



102 




103 




Order please! Mary Shannon, President, presents to the officers, Floyd Wyrick, 
Vice President; Dot Small, Secretary, and Jean Gade, Treasurer, current business. 




Student Council in action. 



Student Council is the backbone of C.T.C. The student govening 
body, consisting of at least two representatives from each year, with 
Its officers elected from these representatives, makes and enforces 
rules of student behavior, cooperates with faculty and school admini- 
stration to make C.T.C. a better school, regulates and coordinates 
school activity, and backs all activities with its full support. It would 
be hard to imagine C.T.C. without this active and versatile group at 
work or without Mrs. Truax, its sponsor, hard at work 
student's interest. 



STUDENT 




Mrs. Truax, sponsor of Student Council, greets freshmen. 



104 



All Aboard! Next stop De Kalb 




One finger — one thumb — Monkey business at the Freshman Tea by the "terrible trio." 




^ Mary Shannon tells freshmen about C.T.C. 



105 



ACTIVITIES 




106 



3^c,F.*^.y'ir(f: 



WORKSHOP 









^t^. 




107 




Shirley Satek, 
Editor in Chief of TEMPO 



Tempo, the college newspaper, which is edited and published 
by the students of C.T.C., is printed six times a semester. Membership 
on Tempo is open to any person who wishes to obtain experience in 
writing, reporting and the make-up of a school paper. The voluntary 
efforts of the staif are rewarded with the presentation of green and 
gold pins at the completion of one year of service. Awards are given 
at the staif banquet which is held at the end of each semester. 




109 




EMBLEM 




Floyd Wyrick Editor in Chief 



'Uncle John," sponsor of the EMBLEM 



students Jf- ^■^■'^.s vearh L 



^« fhe 



^°°p. 




no 



. „v' u. to R- J'"" '••'"'■ 



Es^eWe Rose. 




Ill 



FUTURE TEACHERS OF AMERICA 




C.T.C.'s youngest organization, F.T.A. is one of the most 
successful as far as projects are concerned. It is part of a nationwide 
organization with chapters in many colleges and universities. Member- 
ship brings affiliation with the National Education Association and 
the Illinois Education Association and a year's subscription to the 
N.E.A. Journal and lllitiois Education. 




Recruiting high school seniors for the teaching profession is 
the annual major project. Student speakers talk to high school audiences 
about teaching as a career and the program available for them at 
C.T.C. The May Open House climaxes the recruitment program. 



7 



112 




A.C.E., Association for Childhood Education is a branch of 
the International Association for Childhood Education. 

The organization's purpose is to provide a means by which 
members may extend their understanding of educational theory and 
practice, achieve professional improvement and enjoy professional 
fellowship by means of exchanged ideas and experiences, news of the 
education world, and social contacts. A.C.E.'s aim is to promote better 
educational opportunities for children everywhere. 




113 



FELLOWSHIP 



Fellowship, an organization dedicated to helping those in need, 
is one of C.T.C.'s most worthwhile groups. Under the able direction 
of Mrs. Marie Truax, the students collect toys at Christmas for the 
needy children, eggs for Easter, parties at settlement houses, bake sales 
to raise money to help worthy causes and many other equally worth- 
while activities. Every student on entering C.T.C. is automatically a 
member of this active group. 



The officers of Fellowship advertising their latest sale. 




114 



HISTORY 




115 



THEATRE 




16 



WORKSHOP 




J<\ 



Mary Lou Buckley, emoting. 

Theatre Workshop, C.T.C.'s answer to Broadway, is an organi- 
zation in which any student with sufficient talent and interest can 
learn the fundamentals of acting. Under the able direction of Mr. 
Robert Walker the students put on several plays during the semester. 
Both of the plays this season, "Blithe Spirit" and "Male Animal," have 
given the student body a great deal of enjoyment. Not only does the 
T.W. give plays but they also sponsor theatre parties, picnics, etc., in 
addition to their regular meetings. At the end of the season they have 
a banquet to celebrate the success of the season. 



17 




"Sam" 



?ilAJn 



< « » * » «j * » t 

m 5 A 5 ,* 4 *» « ■ 



The place where the students can release their pent-up emotions 
in song, the choir is one of C.T.C.'s most important organizations. 
Directed by Mr. Lenard Simuitis, the choir gives all the students and 
faculty an uplift by their beautiful music. The choir has many and 
varied programs throughout the semester. The annual Christmas 
program, the spring concert, the banquet given each spring in coop- 
eration with the Phi Alpha are the main highlights of the semester's 
activities. 



118 




Choir Officers, February Richard Higgins, Vice President; Roberta Hodnett, Secretary; Bob Smith, President; 
Barbara Davidson, Librarian, and Don Broholm, Treasurer. 



* ♦" « 



.V^Vf^nrNAA^ 



Choir Officers, September 



Jim Bailey, Treasurer; Holly Adams, Secretary; Lee Fieffer, President; 
Barbara Kelly, Vice President, and Barbara Davidson, Librarian. 




119 



PHI ALPHA 



Come one, come all was the invitation of C.T.C.'s music club, 
Phi Alpha. Although it is primarily a musical organization, all types 
of entertainment, from dancing to acting, were presented at the 
meetings. The music presented was varied, also. Classical, popular, 
and folk music was sung. 

As a group, the members attended several operas, ballets, and 
other musical events. The annual Phi Alpha recital was enjoyed by 
the entire student body of C.T.C. 




120 



KAPPA MU EPSILON 




Lois Rusco, President, shows the K.M.E. Insignia to the new officers, 
Charlene Naser, Marge Whelan, Tom Healy and Dr. Sachs. 



K.M.E. Kappa Mu Epsilon, is the national honorary math 
fraternity. Dr. Jerome Sachs sponsors this select group and membership 
in K.M.E. is considered quite an honor. A minimum of nine credit 
hours in math and a good scholastic average are the requirements. 
Members meet for discussion, antics, and outings at least once a 
month and many of the meetings are open to students interested 
in math. 



121 




122 



SIELS 




123 



BASKETBALL 



BASKETBALL 

Hats ofif to the 1951-52 Cagers. They had a bang-up year, 
setting five new records, and ending up with a thirteen won, five lost 
record. This well-balanced squad's first string consisted of Jim Tracy, 
6'3" center, Captain Helmer Ringstrom and Marty McGrath forwards, 
and Chuck Sheehan and Don Sparks at the guard positions. Ed 
OTarrell and Ed Nicol did fine relief work. 

The future for Coach Boyle's squad is bright. The entire 
squad has at least two years of competition, with the exceptions of 
Don Sparks and Jim Tracy. Several of this year's substitutes should 
give the starters a battle for their positions next year, so the 1952-53 
team should be a real winner. 




124 




^^'^'^^ 



t•\^^^^ 



s^^^^' 



.s^\cs 




New Records Set This Season 

Best Offensive Same CTC 93, Great Lakes 41 

Best Defensive Game _ CTC 79, Roosevelt 32 

Highest Total of Points 1 169 

Best Offensive Record — 68.9 Average 

Best Defensive Record 51.3 Average 



Opponents Score CTC 

Chic. College of Chiropody 39 7 1 

Illinois (Navy Pier) .52 81 

Wheaton 63 51 

De Paul ..- 87 58 

R. Sheridan 48 63 

Samuel Houston (Texas) 46 64 

St. Mary's (Winona) 60 53 

Chicago University 54 67 

Great Lakes 45 69 

Roosevelt 42 63 

Ft. Sheridan. 51 74 

De Kalb ...57 56 

Roosevelt 32 79 

Illinois (Navy Pier) 52 76 

Great Lakes 41 93 

Glenvlew 62 85 

Alumni 42 66 

813 1169 



Individual Scoring Records 

Budil, c 12 

Donaghue, c. 7 

Fewkes, f. 5 

Hennessey, g. 17 

Hendrix, f 13 

McGrath, f 136 

Nicol. f — 77 

O'Farrell, g. 126 

Ringstrom, f. 228 

Sheehan, g 147 

Sparks, g -150 

Tracy, c 230 

Yohanan, g. 16 



High Scorers for Season 

Jim Tracy 230 

Helmer Ringstrom 228 



125 




126 



ACTIVITIES 




Human Relations panel with Tony Weitsel from the Chicago Daily News. 




Mrs. Alberts from Denmark, speaks to the social science club. 



127 



HOMECOMING 




Lights, music, dancing, laughter, beauty and sport, all combine 
to make Homecoming the memorable night that it is. The exciting 
Alumni-Student basketball game, the dancing, the meeting of old 
friends and the highlight of the evening, the crowning of the queen 
make homecoming one of the biggest social affairs of the season. 
Under the able direction of Mrs. Truax and this year's student director, 
Gloria Bertoia, this year's homecoming was one of the most successful 
events of the year. 



128 



HOMECOMING 




r2» 



WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 




130 



Bowling, Badminton, Baseball, Volleyball, Archery, Tennis 
and Swimming, all these represent the W.A.A. Each semester the 
W.A.A. offers many varied and exhausting activities for the women 
of C.T.C. The W.A.A. is a fine example of how organization promotes 
teamwork, better minds, and healthier bodies. A girl can earn her 
school letter by participating in five activities throughout several 
semesters. Ten activities earns a girl her pin and if she is active every 
semester except her practice semester she is awarded a guard, the 




Miss Maethner, sponsor of W.A.A. 



31 




MAA 

Under the competent sponsorship of Coach George Boyle, the 
MAA had its share of a variety of activities. Among the more popular 
activities were Intramural Basketball. This year the spirited Maggots 
captured the number one spot in basketball, in what turned out to be 
a very rousing contest. 

Free swims which were open to the male population of CTC 
and Softball also ranked high on the list of Activities for popularity. 

Probably the most popular event of the year was the Pinochle 
tournament. Ben Johanan and Chuck Sheehan whitewashed Ed Nicol 
and Ed O'Farrell 2-0. 




132 



SENIOR DIRECTORY 

Virginia Alhorn 4841 S. La+robe Ave. 

Joanne Anderson 8034 Channplain Ave. 

Lillian Anderson 1840 W. 83rd St. 

Mary Anderson 26 W. Marquette Rd. 

Lorraine Antimonik 1901 W. 13th St. 

Florence Armin 6754 Normal Blvd. 

Marvin Azriel 4020 W. Monroe St. 

Thomas Barton 5203 Harper Ave. 

Jacqueline Benson... 2218 E. 79th St. 

Norma Bernsohn 5401 S. Ellis Ave. 

Gloria Bertoia .12036 S. State St. 

Madaline Betker 3448 N. Kilpatrick Ave. 

Rosemary Biagi 3214 N. Albany Ave. 

Marian Borgstrom 1641 N. Meade Ave. 

Geraldine Bowman 7324 S. Wabash Ave. 

Delores Bronars 4725 N. Kenmore Ave. 

Henry Bronars 4725 N. Kenmore Ave. 

Eileen Brown 2258 W. 37th St. 

Jeanne Brunner 6644 S. Marshfield Ave. 

Dorothy Buehler '921 S. Peoria St. 

Dolores Bulinski - 5240 W. Eddy St. 

William Bunch 2034 Eastwood Ave. 

William Burchett 7923 Anthony Aye. 

Ruth Burgeman 4970 Marine Dr.ve 

Margaret Byrnes 7210 Woodlawn Ave. 

Maude Carson 6025 N Mason Ave 

Mary Casey 6645 S. Paulina St. 

Joan Catalan 3108 W. Add.son Blvd. 

Marlorie Clouse - 7344 Emerald Ave. 

Gladys Coleman - 3748 Vmcennes Ave. 

Ruth Colquhon 2723 N. Ma,or Ave. 

Marilyn Conroy 8052 S Winchester Ave. 

Norma Cooper ^|iloV^'"° I a'^" 

Rosemary Crane '^',\?w''70t^St' 

Jessie Cutt .„Jiy , , A 

Mary Dalianis .2048 N. Lawler Ave. 

Richard Davis . Jo^li^.Tl a'^ 

Grace Dewar - '"^0^:^^^'"°"" a 

Marian Drebing o.?n^M mT/^^' 

Helen Farazis 2150 N. Halsted St. 



LoU Farlev "556 Harvard Ave 

Lola hariey ^^^ ^ ki,,^..^++^ Avo 

rginia Faron 

Elvira Fiascone 



w. . . r'^ ^„ 8600 S. Marquette Ave. 

V.rgm.a Faron ^^^ W. 65th St. 



cmra r.c.un. ^^^^ ^ E\hahe\h St. 

^T pl.rn^ ■" 8527 Euclid Ave. 

Pauline Foerner... , . ^^^ 

Howard Freedman 701 lb y^^^^^ ^^ 

Dorothy Freeman ^^ ^^^ 

U^'^^"' ■::::i68 E. 1 6th St., Chicago Heights 

Lula t7avin ^^^^ ^ ^^^^^ 5^ 

Marilyn Gegan ^ ^^^^ p^,^^„ 

Raymond Gerl.k '^'«> ^ ^ ^^^ 

Rita Giancola ■'•'"^ 



133 



Sally Gibbons 6829 $. Bishop St. 

Marcia Grasse 8940 S. Laflin St. 

Mary GrifRn 3432 W. Hirsh St. 

Helen Groetsema 5318 S. Campbell Ave. 

Gloria Grolla 10959 Vernon Ave. 

Joan Heffernan 9545 S. Hamilton Ave. 

E. Clare Hyland 8322 S. Paulina St. 

Ruth Jackson 2952 Lake Park Ave. 

Ethel Kamen 8237 Evans Ave. 

Roseaiie Kameron 4731 N. Winthrop Ave. 

Alice Kanelos 522 Jackson Ave., River Forest 

Sally Keeley 4407 S. Normal Ave. 

Joan Kellogg. 17 N. Mason Ave. 

Irene Kelly 4914 W. Monroe St. 

Elizabeth Kloman 1229 W. 98th St. 

Irene Knock 5615 S. Carpenter St. 

Joanne Knoebel 10504 E. Whipple St. 

Josephine Komiak 1031 N. Richmond St. 

Albert Korach 7181 W. Grand Ave. 

Marjorie Koranda 5828 S. Sawyer Ave. 

Rita Kunka 5455 S. Justine St. 

Ruth Lawler . 6730 Chappel Ave. 

Shirley Lee 6616 Vernon Ave. 

Genevieve Leonard 519 E. 41st St. 

Lorraine Leyden 7950 S. Ada St. 

Marie Locke 6143 Loomis Blvd. 

Betty Madsen 5436 N. Long Ave. 

Donald Martin 646 W. 61st PI. 

Alfred Matz 9815 Avenue L 

Jaqueline Meyers 9015 S. Paulina St. 

Marybeth Moran 24 S. Central Ave. 

Anne Morgan 5131 Washington Blvd. 

Leslie Morris 2021 W. 68th PI. 

William Mulligan 8353 S. Wood St. 

Rita McGwin 9233 S. State St. 

Patricia McHugh .10344 S. Fairfield Ave. 

Mary McNally .8331 S. Hermitage Ave. 

Donald Nuzzo 2929 W. Arthington St. 

Mary O'Leary .4353 W. Monroe St. 

Mary O'Malley 7606 S. Wood St. 

Vincent O'Neill 12922 S. Eggleston Ave. 

Joyce C. Ovitz .3010 W. Ainslie St. 

Charles Pace 1321 N. Parkside Ave. 

Grace Parker 10337 S. Oakley Ave. 

Arnold M. Perlin 4714 N. Central Park Ave. 

Jack L. Perlin 840 Montrose Ave. 

Avic Perry 6555 S. Harvard Ave. 

Joan Peterson 562! S. Justine St. 

George Pfeiffer .7919 S. Mozart St. 

Renee Pope 12854 S. Wallace St. 

Margaret Ratajczak 3251 S. Bell Ave. 

Daniel Remahl 1455 Cuyler Ave. 



134 



Loretta Rocka 38 E. lOlst PI. 

Grace Roessler 1106 N. Kedzie Ave. 

Mary Rohan 7714 S. Marshfield Ave. 

Vincent Romano |0I3 S. Peoria St. 

Patricia Russell .3433 Janssen Ave. 

Carol Sanders 3412 Jackson Blvd. 

Shirley Satek .8019 S. Marshfield Ave. 

Marie Scopelite 9323 S. Ridgeland Ave. 

Adeline Seaman 5642 S. Homan Ave. 

Florence Shapiro 3818 Lawrence Ave. 

Mary Shea |729 N. Nagle Aye. 

Jeanne Slaughter 6538 S. Aberdeen St. 

Jean Smith . 4856 VIncennes Ave. 

Wilma Smith 1017 N. Larrabee St. 

Jean Sondin 425 W. 74th St. 

Irene Tatone 662 N. Carpenter St. 

Eleanore Teske 3918 W. 63rd PI. 

Charlane Thompson 3038 W. Fifth Ave. 

Clarice Tinnelle 5846 S. Calumet Ave. 

Jean Tomek 4437 S. Trumbull Ave. 

Carol Turner 6046 Kimbark Ave. 

Robert Van Hoy. II0I4 S. Wallace St. 

Pearl Waicosky ...4153 S. Maplewood Ave. 

Betty Walker 8556 Phillips Ave. 

Barbara Wallace 4539 S. Calumet Ave. 

Maureen Ward 7807 Cregier Ave. 

Margaret Weber .::... 9242 S. Ada St. 

Martha Weiler 205 N. Leamington Ave. 

Ruth Wesley 9338 S. Prairie Ave. 

Virginia Witzman 2912 E. 78th St. 

Dina Zouras 6517 S. Damen Ave. 

Ann Zubak 2455 S. St. Louis Ave. 



135 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

PHI DELTA SIGMA 



^ 







COMPLIMENTS OF 

BARCLAY STUDIOS 

6550 S. Hals+ed Street 
ENglewood 4-2301 

Artists . . . Publishers . . . Advertising Agents 
since 1933 



136 




AB 



CONGRATULATIONS 

TO THE 1952 GRADUATES OF THE 

CHICAGO TEACHERS COLLEGE 

JO -JO BOOK STORE 

4-2483 401 W. 69th St. 

(Southwest Corner) 

Everything for the College Student 



137 



CHARTER A BUS 

Keep Your Group Together 
Anytime — Anywhere 

Checkerway Charter Coach Co. 

5345 Cottage Grove Ave. 
BUtterfield 8-6400 


Compliments of 

Qa.Hck MUSIC SHOPS 

733 W. 63rd St. 

Substantial Discounts to 
All Students and Faculty 


Vvlodern Lfrapkic ^nduilrleS 

PRINTERS 

Social and Commercial 

Letterpress and Offset 

ENglewood 4-4403 6252 S. Princeton Ave. 


Allied Typesetting Co* 

6250 Princeton Avenue 
WEntworth 6-6104 

A Dependable Typesetting Service 
for the Discriminating Printer 


COiVIPLlMENTS 

OF 

TEMPO 


FROM YOUR FRIENDS 
OF 

W. A. A. 



138 




THE CHICAGO TEACHERS' UNION 

CONGRATULATES 

THE 1952 GRADUATES 

OF THE 

CHICAGO TEACHERS COLLEGE 

AND WELCOMES THEM 

AS FELLOW TEACHERS 

INTO THE 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF CHICAGO 



139 



HERE'S TO THE EMBLEM OF 1952! 
It chronicles history at C.T.C. faithfully. Both the serious and 
more humorous aspects of life on the C.T.C. campus are portrayed. 
In years to come the old grads will find the Emblem ideal for 
reminiscing about the valuable, though at times hectic, years they 
spent at C.T.C. The C.T.C. faculty deserves and receives the loyalty 
of its student body because of intelligent and purposeful efforts to 
develop excellent teachers for Chicago's school children. We take 
pride in our part in having supplied texts and college supplies to 
students at C.T.C. since 1934. 

WERKMAN'S BOOK STORE 

Northwest corner, 69th and Stewart 



REHMAHL'S LITTLE GALLERY 

COMPLIMENTS Pictures for Home and School 
OF 

CHICAGO TEACHERS ^^^^"'^ Framing, Paintings Cleaned 

COLLEGE CAFETERIA ^"^ Restored 



3962 N. Clark St., Chicago 13 



Compliments of 
VINCE'S RESTAURANT compliments of 

Home Cooking at its Best A FRIEND 

69th Street and Parnell Avenue 



140 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



CLASS OF *'53 



141 




QrmfUmje^di o^ ? 




142 



dtiiaarapiu 



143 



144